Search Results: 14 total

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This folder contains a detailed report from the Jewish Democratic Committees of Mediaș regarding upcoming elections and activitities to prepare for the same.

The Jewish Communities of Romania Collection (sometimes also described by the Romanian National Archives as the Documents Collection of the Jewish Communities of Romania) contains documents created and received by Jewish communities and organizations functioning in Romania from the 19th century to the first half of the 20th century.

The documents until World War II are composed of a variety of items reflecting community life, including statutes, correspondence, reports, and membership lists. Documents from the World War II period generally address the plight of Romanian Jews during this period. This material includes reports on persecutions and expropriations, correspondence and other documents related to deportees, and emigration paperwork. The post-World War II material generally deals with the repatriation of Jewish deportees to the Romanian-organized camps in Transnistria, the welfare of survivors, emigration, and the activities of the Federation of Jewish Communities in Romania and of the Jewish Democratic Committee (communist Jewish organization). For the complete inventory list of the collection, please see this link (in Romanian only): http://www.arhivelenationale.ro/images/custom/image/Pdf-uri/DANIC_Fonduri%20si%20colectii/Feudale/Colectia%20comunitati%20evreiesti%201818-1959.pdf

JBAT archivists surveyed folders containing material related specifically to Bukovina and Transylvania. For details on the contents of these folders, please see the list below and click on any link.

This folder contains correspondence between the central offices of the Jewish council and the Cernăuți offices. The correspondence and material primarily concerns the budget, though some other matters are also mentioned (requests for holiday materials,etc).

This collection contains papers created by the Jewish Democratic Committee for the county of Mureș and town of Târgu Mureș and for the local branch of Reghin. The folders contain meeting minutes, reports, surveys, and other written material. It is not clear how the county of Mureș differed from the region of Mureș (there is also a collection for the Regional Jewish Democratic Committee for Mureș). The committee had a wide range of responsibilities, surpassing basic political tasks. The reports and meetings record decisions about secular and religious holidays, the Jewish school, teachers, emigration matters, unresolved events (missing persons) from World War II, religious staff (butcher, teachers), cultural events, and general happenings in community life. There are surveys on the community, including data on community numbers, language, occupations, and so forth. There are reports on the receptiveness to communist ideology versus Zionism and specific numbers are given for those who have requested to emigrate. There may also be speeches made by the leadership on holidays or for other gatherings. The collection may be of interest to those studying Jewish life in the immediate post-war period and especially those looking at questions of identity, Zionism, and Jewish roles in early communist Romania.

Please note that the inventory for this collection was missing in 2015, so the precise contents are not known. Two folders were requested, one dealt with the regional committee, as per the title of the collection; the other folder was from the Sighișoara committee. The folders contain meeting minutes, reports, surveys, and other written material created by the Jewish Democratic Committee for the region of Mureș (or Sighișoara). It is not clear how the region of Mureș differed from the county of Mureș (there is also a collection for the Jewish Democratic Committee for Mureș County). The committee had a wide range of responsibilities, surpassing basic political tasks. The reports and meetings record decisions about secular and religious holidays, the Jewish school, teachers, emigration matters, unresolved events (missing persons) from World War II, religious staff (butcher, teachers), cultural events, and general happenings in community life. There are surveys on the community, including data on community numbers, language, occupations, and so forth. There are reports on the surrounding towns and the respective population's receptiveness to communist ideology versus Zionism. There may also be speeches made by the leadership on holidays or for other gatherings. The collection may be of interest to those studying Jewish life in the immediate post-war period and especially those looking at questions of identity, Zionism, and Jewish roles in early communist Romania.

This collection contains minutes of meetings, reports, correspondence, speeches, and other memos written by or about the Jewish Democratic Committee of Târnăveni. The committee had a wide range of responsibilities, surpassing basic political tasks. The reports and meetings record decisions about secular and religious holidays, the Jewish school, teachers, emigration matters, unresolved events (missing persons) from World War II, religious staff (butcher, teachers), cultural events, and general happenings in community life. There are surveys on the community, including data on community numbers, language, occupations, and so forth. The collection may be of interest to those studying Jewish life in the immediate post-war period and especially those looking at questions of identity.

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The Medias Jewish Community Collection contains material spanning the life of the community, with documents dating from the late 19th century until the end of the communist era as well as general administrative paperwork into the 1990s (when the community, for all intents and purposes, no longer existed). The bulk of the material is from the mid-20th century (1940s-1970s) and of administrative or financial nature. Several extensive items of particular historic significance have been digitized and are available below in Series III: the 500-page book of meeting minutes covering board member and community meetings from 1930-1947 (Box OS21); hundreds of registration forms created by the Jewish Council (Centrala Evreilor) during the war which recorded an individual's family background up to the grandparents (names, birthplaces and date) (Box OS18 and OS19); the burial registry with details on tombstone location, date (and sometimes cause) of death and accompanying index of names (OS13); and the cemetery map (last item in Series III). The original statutes of the community, in Hungarian from 1894, as well as later German and Romanian versions, are also digitized and can be found in Series V (SD2/folder 2). The material in this collection may be of interest to those researching Jewish life, identity, and culture in southern Transylvania before and during World War II and Jewish life under the Romanian communist government. For additional details on the contents of each series, please see the comprehensive container list below. The collection is arranged by series and chronologically within each series.

This files contains hundreds of petitions and related correspondence from a variety of cultural organizations in Câmpulung requesting authorization to host cultural events and gatherings. The events range from performances by guest opera singers, masked balls, all-night dances, hora parties, picnics, readings, and other gatherings. Numerous Jewish organizations are represented as well as organizations which had large numbers of Jewish members, such as the social democrat political party. Of particular interest are several documents related to the Yiddish and Zionist-oriented organization Ber Borochov Jewish Cultural League (Liga culturala evrească).

This register book was apparently used by the spa and resort ”Regina Maria” (Queen Maria”) to record guests. The book records the name, birth year, and occupation of the guest, day of arrival, spouse's name and birth year (sometimes), town of residence, identity card information, address where they are staying in Solca, and cost for the spa services. Solca was known for its salt waters and fresh air. The vast majority of the guests in this book are Jews, many from Bessarabia as well as elsewhere in the Regat and of course Bukovina.

This item is a 1938 calendar printed by agricultural equipment company Samuel Rosenberg. The calendar is similar to the one from 1934, but now does not include Jewish holidays, only Orthodox and Catholic (see "Calendar by Lazar Madfes", also in the Documents Collection).

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