Search Results: 39 total

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This folder contains paperwork created by or for the Joint Distribution Committee (JDC) regarding their work with refugees and survivors of World War II. Material includes lists of aid recipients (orphans from Transnistria, other Bukovinan Transnistria survivors, Transylvania survivors of Auschwitz) and correspondence from various communities requesting assistance in various forms.

This folders contains hundreds of documents created by various border control and municipal authorities from towns near the Romanian-Soviet border (Bukovina). The documents all date from a few weeks, the end of March 1946 to mid April 1946. During this period (and before and after) thousands of repatriated Jews left northern Bukovina (U.S.S.R.) for southern Bukovina (Romania), often from there moving to other parts of the country. The documents include certificates of border crossing; petitions from families or acquaintances for individuals to live with them; paperwork for the transfer of individuals or groups of people from one part of the country to another. Most of the documents include vital facts about the respective individual including birth date and place and family members. Virtually all of them mention that the individual was in Transnistria or the U.S.S.R.. A very few contain photographs or other forms of identification (birth certificate copies or other identity cards) and there are several pieces of private familial correspondence mixed in with the official documents. Please note that there are several more folders containing similar documents, ie folder number 13/1946.

This folders contains hundreds of documents created by various border control and municipal authorities from towns near the Romanian-Soviet border (Bukovina). The documents all date from a few weeks, the end of March 1946 to mid April 1946. During this period (and before and after) thousands of repatriated Jews left northern Bukovina (U.S.S.R.) for southern Bukovina (Romania), often from there moving to other parts of the country. The documents include certificates of border crossing; petitions from families or acquaintances for individuals to live with them; paperwork for the transfer of individuals or groups of people from one part of the country to another. Of interest is, for example, the documents regarding a group of more than 100 Jews all originally from Noua Sulita, which petitioned to be moved together to a town near Arad, in western Romania. Most of the documents include vital facts about the respective individual including birth date and place and family members. Virtually all of them mention that the individual was in Transnistria or the U.S.S.R.. A very few contain photographs or other forms of identification (birth certificate copies or other identity cards) and there are also a small number of official reports or memos on the situation. Please note that there are several more folders containing similar documents, ie folder nr. 14/1946.

This folder contains a variety of paperwork created by or addressed to the Association for the Support of Jews from Southern Bukovina (Asociația pentru Sprijinirea Evreilor din Bukovina de Sud). The material includes correspondence with various Jewish organizations, Zionist and charitable, Romanian and international; private petitions for assistance; applications for job positions; minutes of board meetings; memos on various individual cases; paperwork regarding the transport of Transnistrian deportees back into Romania (from the part of the railroad company); paperwork regarding a home for the repatriated (homeless) Bukovina Jews in Bucharest; lists of individuals who received assistance; and other related documents.

This folder contains several hundred documents related to repatriated Jews from Bukovina and Transylvania. The material primarily deals with repatriated Jews residing in Mediaș, Timișoara, Buzău, and Bucharest. Most of the documents are charts and forms with names of those who received aid. The charts or forms generally include birth information, occupation, some deportation details, and assistance received.

This folder contains several hundred documents related to repatriated Jews from Bukovina and Transylvania. The material includes lists of supplies distributed to the needy, charts of names (generally with birth information, occupation, some deportation details), other registration forms, identity forms, some photographs of individuals, and excerpts from a Yiddish newspaper printed in South Africa.

This folder contains a booklet with carbon copy receipts of dues paid by members of the Association for the Support of Jews from Southern Bukovina (Asociația pentru Sprijinirea Evreilor din Bukovina de Sud).

The Jewish Communities of Romania Collection (sometimes also described by the Romanian National Archives as the Documents Collection of the Jewish Communities of Romania) contains documents created and received by Jewish communities and organizations functioning in Romania from the 19th century to the first half of the 20th century.

The documents until World War II are composed of a variety of items reflecting community life, including statutes, correspondence, reports, and membership lists. Documents from the World War II period generally address the plight of Romanian Jews during this period. This material includes reports on persecutions and expropriations, correspondence and other documents related to deportees, and emigration paperwork. The post-World War II material generally deals with the repatriation of Jewish deportees to the Romanian-organized camps in Transnistria, the welfare of survivors, emigration, and the activities of the Federation of Jewish Communities in Romania and of the Jewish Democratic Committee (communist Jewish organization). For the complete inventory list of the collection, please see this link (in Romanian only): http://www.arhivelenationale.ro/images/custom/image/Pdf-uri/DANIC_Fonduri%20si%20colectii/Feudale/Colectia%20comunitati%20evreiesti%201818-1959.pdf

JBAT archivists surveyed folders containing material related specifically to Bukovina and Transylvania. For details on the contents of these folders, please see the list below and click on any link.

Please note JBAT archivists did not survey this material directly. The folder description provided by the CNSAS inventory reads (please note no specific towns are mentioned in this description): Telegrams and ordinances regarding the evacuation of citizens of Jewish ethnicity and the punishment of those who rob or kill them; the context of the events taking place at Iași; documents regarding the Romanianization of some firms in the county of Târnava Mică.

The collection includes the paperwork and material collected by the Mureș county Securitate (Romanian Communist Secret Police) offices under communism. The material includes select folders from the pre-communist period; these folders were presumably in the possession of the police and seized by the Securitate at some point in time. At the time of the JBAT survey (2015), the inventory for this collection was accessible only at the physical location of the CNSAS and only in digital form on the computers of the CNSAS reading room. The inventory provided no indication as to the linear extent of the collection and gave no additional details as to its history, content, or the number of pages in individual folders. The collection is large, over 1,000 files, and as such there are many hundreds of folders which are obliquely titled and may contain reference to Jewish residents. It was beyond the scope of the present survey to inspect the contents of all such folders. There are, however, a number of folders with titles specifically referencing the Jewish content. Several of these contain material from World War II and others contain histories of the local Jewish communities. For details on folders mentioned above and others with material clearly related to the Jewish population, please click on the link(s) below.

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