Search Results: 95 total

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The books that form the Mediaș library were found in the Mediaș synagogue and Jewish community offices. The majority of the German and Hungarian-language volumes were catalogued by local high school students in the course of a project in 2016-2017. The volumes appear to be a mixture of private and communally-owned books. Though they are mostly religious books including siddurim and Jewish religious texts, some secular volumes were also found. In cases where owner information was inscribed or stamped in the book, a note was made in the catalogue record and, in general, a photo of the personal inscription was made. Please click on the individual titles below for more information.

Please note that this collection is being constantly updated. Please check back regularly for new additions. 

This book records marriages that took place within families in and around the town of Lugoj from 1852-1885. Note that some of the weddings themselves took place in locations other than Lugoj. Entries record the names, age, marital status (widow, etc), and residence of the bride and groom; their parents' place of residence; and date, place, and officiant of the wedding. The book is printed and recorded in German. Unusually, the book also contains numerous records of divorces.

This collection consists exclusively of immatriculation logs from the years 1927-1939. The inventory created by the National Archives provides no information regarding the history of the school or whether it functioned before and after the dates contained. Such registration books generally contain significant biographical information on the pupils including parent names and occupations; mother tongue; residence address; birth date and place; and so forth.

This collection consists exclusively of immatriculation logs and class register books from the years 1927-1948. It appears the school was founded in 1927 with one class as each subsequent year the registers increase by one grade level. It was a four-grade school until 1940 after which it expanded to eight grades during the war period. The inventory created by the National Archives provides no information regarding the history of the school or the papers; presumably the school closed down in 1947 in the wake of education reform legislation.

This collection represents a fairly complete set of documents created by the one of the Jewish boys lycees of Timișoara. The collection contains comprehensive immatriculation and grade registers as well as a wide range of administrative material. This includes miscellaneous correspondence with authorities; teaching staff papers; logs of incoming and outgoing correspondence; exams; and graduation certificates. The material is uninterrupted from 1922 through to the schools presumable closure in 1947 in the wake of an education reform. As such it represents a unique perspective on Jewish education and identity in the Banat from the immediate post-WWI period throughout the interwar years and World War II. Unfortunately the inventory created by the National Archives provides no details on the school's background, for example whether it existed prior to 1919 and its relation to the other Jewish schools in Timișoara.

This collection represents a remarkably complete set of documents created by the one of the Jewish boys lycees of Timișoara. Unfortunately the current inventory created by the National Archives appears to be in need of revision as numerous items are crossed out or marked with the note "see nr. XYZ" and as such it is difficult to get a clear overview of the full contents of the collection. Nevertheless, the collection appears to contain comprehensive immatriculation and grade registers as well as a wide range of administrative material. This includes correspondence with authorities; teaching staff papers; logs of incoming and outgoing correspondence; minutes of staff meetings; exams; and graduation certificates. Included in the folders of correspondence is material specifically related to the association of Jewish teachers of the Banat and Transylvania and correspondence from the union of Jewish communities [of Transylvania and the Banat?]. There is also a folder related to passive defense dated to World War II. The material is uninterrupted from 1919 through to the schools presumable closure in 1948 in the wake of an education reform. As such it represents a unique perspective on Jewish education and identity in the Banat from the immediate post-WWI period throughout the interwar years and World War II. Unfortunately the inventory created by the National Archives provides no details on the school's background, for example whether it existed prior to 1919 and its relation to the other Jewish schools in Timișoara.

This collection represents a remarkably complete set of documents created by the Jewish girls lycee of Timișoara. The collection contains comprehensive immatriculation and grade registers as well as a wide range of administrative material. This includes correspondence with authorities; a log of school inspections (1923-1943); teaching staff biographies and papers; logs of incoming and outgoing correspondence; teaching curriculum; statistical information; minutes of staff meetings; and graduation certificates. The material is uninterrupted from the 1920s through to the schools presumable closure in 1947 in the wake of an education reform. As such it represents a unique perspective on Jewish education and identity in the Banat from the immediate post-WWI period throughout the interwar years and World War II. Unfortunately the inventory created by the National Archives provides no details on the school's background, for example whether it existed prior to 1923, and its relation to the other Jewish schools in Timișoara.

This collection contains numerous statutes from a wide array of organizations and establishments in the county of Timiș. Of interest to those researching Jewish history are folders five and six. Folder five contains, in addition to other statutes, the statutes of the Jewish Women's Charity Society of Caransebeș (Reuniunea de binefacere a femeilor evreești din Caransebeș). These specific statutes were approved in 1931; the society was founded in 1884. The statutes are nine pages long and typed in Romanian. Folder six contains the statutes for two organizations: The Chevra Kadisha society of Reșița (copy of statutes from 1916) and the Chevra Kadisha society of Caransebeș (copy of statutes from 1928). Both are typed and in Romanian.

This collection contains one item, a book maintained by the Lugos Jewish community from 1855-1939, though it was only used sporadically in the 20th century. Please note the book is catalogued by the National Archives as dating only from 1855-1856. The book appears to have been used to record membership details and other information regarding civil records and relationships within the community. Beginning from left to right, the book was used as a ledger of member information. Members are recorded, organized by family; information includes names and birth dates and date of entry as member of the community. The first entries are from 1855 and reach into the 1880s but by this time it appears to have devolved into a record of births and deaths information. There are also random notes regarding marriage testimonies and Hebrew name equivalents for secular names. Reading from right to left, the book includes a dedication from the community board (in German) which is followed by a three-page text in Yiddish. The Yiddish handwriting is legible but not excellent.

This collection contains minutes of meetings, reports, correspondence, speeches, members' biographies and other memos written by or about or sent to the Jewish Democratic Committee of Timișoara and/or Lugoj. There are also documents from Zionist organizations not necessarily related to the committee but related to Jewish life in general. The committee had a wide range of responsibilities, surpassing basic political tasks. There are a total of 26 folders each containing many hundreds of documents. The collection may be of interest to those studying Jewish life in the immediate post-war period and especially those looking at questions of identity.

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