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This collection comprises civil registers recording births, marriages, and deaths. Originally the registers were kept by each respective parish, church, synagogue, etc. In the 1950s they were collected by the National Archives and made into this overarching collection. The collection is organized alphabetically by location, then by religious community. All Jewish registers held at the Cluj archives are described in detail below; please click on a title for more information.

This collection comprises civil registers recording births, marriages, and deaths. Originally the registers were kept by each respective parish, church, synagogue, etc. In the 1950s they were collected by the National Archives and made into this overarching collection. The collection is generally organized by religion, with the Jewish community collections at the end of the inventory. In addition to birth, marriage, and death records, some of the registers, primarily birth registers, record conversions to Judaism. All Jewish registers held at the Timiș archives are described in detail below; please click on a title for more information.

This collection comprises civil registers recording births, marriages, and deaths. Originally the registers were kept by each respective parish, church, synagogue, etc. In the 1950s they were collected by the National Archives and made into this overarching collection. The collection is organized by locality and then religion. In addition to birth, marriage, and death records, some of the Christian registers record conversions, baptisms, confirmations, pastor or priest names, and other notes on the development of the community. The Romanian preface to a similar collection in the Mureș county archives notes that in 1784 the Jewish communities were made to record their civil records under the supervision of the Catholic priests. It is unclear whether this may indicate that 18th century Jewish records could be found within Catholic record books. In any case, there are no extant Jewish registers dating prior to the 1820s in the district of Alba in this collection, though births taking place as early as the early 1800s were recorded after the fact in some registers. All Jewish registers held at the Alba archives are described in detail below; please click on a title for more information.

This is the collection of records of birth, marriage, and death, usually in the form of register books kept by religious and municipal officials. The collection is arranged alphabetically by the name of the locality, and then, if applicable, subdivided by religious denomination. In the case of larger municipalities, relevant records may have been kept by both the local the Jewish community and the municipality.

This collection comprises civil registers recording birth, marriage, and death records. Originally the registers were kept by each respective parish, church, synagogue, etc. In the 1950s they were collected by the National Archives and made into this overarching collection. The collection is organized by locality and then religion. In addition to birth, marriage, and death records, some of the Christian registers record conversions, baptisms, confirmations, pastor or priest names, and other notes on the development of the community. The Romanian preface to the collection notes that in 1784 the Jewish communities were made to record their civil records under the supervision of the Catholic priests. It is unclear whether this may indicate that 18th century Jewish records might be found within Catholic record books. In any case, there are no extant Jewish registers prior to 1815. Of interest in this civil record collection in the county of Mureș are the numerous registers from rural areas, especially from the area around the small town of Sângeorgiu de Pădure, also the region of the socalled Szekely Sabbatarians. All Jewish registers held at the Mureș archives are described in detail below.

This collection contains comprehensive material from the main Catholic school in Târgu Mureș. In general, it appears that Jewish students were more likely to attend the Protestant schools, but one finds Jewish pupils in these records occasionally. The collection begins with papers from the mid-late 18th century, primarily dealing with administrative matters, ie contracts, rental agreements, decrees, lists of students. Beginning in the 19th century, there are fairly consistent immatriculation registers as well as folders containing correspondence on school affairs. Inventories of furnishings and libraries begin to appear consistently. By the 1870s, there are approximately 10 folders per year, containing meeting minutes of the school staff, statistical information, correspondence, immatriculation records, staff instructions, budget documents, and other miscellaneous papers. At the end of the inventory there are several items not related to this school, they contain diploma certificates from a school in Miercurea Ciuc, Târgu Secuiesc, and from the Școala Normală in Târgu Mureș (School of Education). These items date from 1929-1940.

The relevant portion of this collection are the indices and registers (1853-1861) of the Imperial County Office of Sibiu. Indices are arranged alphabetically by name of individual or organization, or in some cases by topic. Registers are arranged in approximate chronological order. As such, one typically can find relevant entries by searching for words like “Juden” or “Israeliten” (Jews), or by the names of individual members of the Jewish community. The indexes and registers further provide a short summary of the case or document, along with the case or document number. The registers typically provide a fuller summary and often provide the date of opening of the case, and the date of resolution, as well as a short description of the resolution. In some cases, the documents may be preserved, and may be requested by the document numbers recorded in the registers and indices, although not all documents are still extant. In addition to the indices and registers which comprise the bulk of the collection, there are also indices for circulars and various orders (1852-1856), a register of recruits (1861), and registers and indices for local offices: Sibiu (1853-1854), Orlat (1856-1860), Cisnădie (1853-1854), and Săliște (1851-1854).

This collection consists of registers of “allodial” accounts, both incomes and expenses. Allodial in the context of Sibiu and the Saxon region in general, the Fundus Regius, appears to denote lands and assets which were managed collectively, at least by members of the Saxon University, rather than being the property of individual feudal lords or noblemen, as was more typically the case in the Transylvanian counties (Comitates). As such, these registers concern expense accounts pertaining broadly both to Sibiu as a whole, as well as the Seven Chairs administrative district administered by the Saxon University. These registers appear to record incomes and expenses arising from taxation, administrative expenses relating to the municipal and regional government, and expenses for social and cultural programs such as assistance to needy residents and support for state theaters. These registers are closely related to similar expense and income registers kept by individual public officials, such as the Stadthann, which are listed on the separate inventory 210, Socoteli economice. Registers of municipal Consular expenses and incomes are found in inventory 207, and customs incomes and expenses, in particular for the tollhouse at Turnu Roșu, can be found in inventory 197. As the collection is quite extensive, it was not possible during the survey to get a comprehensive overview of the entire collection, but nonetheless some of the taxation registers do show evidence of Jewish taxpayers, see for example the register entitled Casierie de impozit nr. 152. This ledger divides heads of household into three broad categories: Citizens (Bürger, Freedmen (Libertinen), and Tenants (Inquilinen). Members of the local Jewish community, such as Markus and Mendel Klärmann and Simon Horovitz, do appear in this register, primarily in the “Libertinen” category, although interestingly Markus Klärmann appears both as a Bürger and as a Libertine. The name of the head of household is accompanied by a house number, and then followed by columns enumerating the taxes which they are due to pay.

This collection consists of registers and a few other documents containing decisions relating to small claims between city and district residents. A comprehensive survey was beyond the scope of the present project, but it is likely that some of the records contain information regarding Jewish inhabitants in the region.

This collection consists of ledgers and indices of regulatory measures enacted by the Sibiu Magistrate. The materials on this collection date largely to the 18th and early 19th century, thus covering a period before substantial Jewish settlement in the jurisdiction, although item number 4 did turn up evidence of an 1829 decision pertaining to Jews and pharmaceuticals. It is possible other relevant cases may be recorded in these registers as well; a thorough investigation of the contents was beyond the scope of the present survey. See page 689/80 of nr. crt. 4, containing a decree from 1829 September 10, stating that Jews are permitted neither to trade in pharmaceuticals nor to operate pharmacies, and that any pharmaceuticals discovered to have been “defiled” [verfault] by Jews are to be reported immediately to the authorities.

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