Search Results: 37 total

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This folders contains hundreds of documents created by various border control and municipal authorities from towns near the Romanian-Soviet border (Bukovina). The documents all date from a few weeks, the end of March 1946 to mid April 1946. During this period (and before and after) thousands of repatriated Jews left northern Bukovina (U.S.S.R.) for southern Bukovina (Romania), often from there moving to other parts of the country. The documents include certificates of border crossing; petitions from families or acquaintances for individuals to live with them; paperwork for the transfer of individuals or groups of people from one part of the country to another. Most of the documents include vital facts about the respective individual including birth date and place and family members. Virtually all of them mention that the individual was in Transnistria or the U.S.S.R.. A very few contain photographs or other forms of identification (birth certificate copies or other identity cards) and there are several pieces of private familial correspondence mixed in with the official documents. Please note that there are several more folders containing similar documents, ie folder number 13/1946.

This folders contains hundreds of documents created by various border control and municipal authorities from towns near the Romanian-Soviet border (Bukovina). The documents all date from a few weeks, the end of March 1946 to mid April 1946. During this period (and before and after) thousands of repatriated Jews left northern Bukovina (U.S.S.R.) for southern Bukovina (Romania), often from there moving to other parts of the country. The documents include certificates of border crossing; petitions from families or acquaintances for individuals to live with them; paperwork for the transfer of individuals or groups of people from one part of the country to another. Of interest is, for example, the documents regarding a group of more than 100 Jews all originally from Noua Sulita, which petitioned to be moved together to a town near Arad, in western Romania. Most of the documents include vital facts about the respective individual including birth date and place and family members. Virtually all of them mention that the individual was in Transnistria or the U.S.S.R.. A very few contain photographs or other forms of identification (birth certificate copies or other identity cards) and there are also a small number of official reports or memos on the situation. Please note that there are several more folders containing similar documents, ie folder nr. 14/1946.

This folder contains several hundred documents related to repatriated Jews from Bukovina and Transylvania. The material primarily deals with repatriated Jews residing in Mediaș, Timișoara, Buzău, and Bucharest. Most of the documents are charts and forms with names of those who received aid. The charts or forms generally include birth information, occupation, some deportation details, and assistance received.

This folder contains correspondence regarding missing persons sought after World War II. Most of the correspondence is from or to HIAS (Hebrew Sheltering and Immigrant Aid Society). A large number of the persons sought are from various towns in Bukovina, but there are also inquiries regarding individuals originally from Transylvania or elsewhere in Romania. In a few rare instances personal letters are included in the correspondence.

This folder contains three documents: two maps created by the statistics department of the Centrala Evreilor din România (Jewish Council of Romania) which depict Jewish population fluctuations between 1930 and 1942 in Romania as a whole and broken down by regions. The third document is one long sheet, folder so as to create 10 pages, with detailed statistical breakdowns of the Jewish population. The pages are numbered beginning with 65, so this "pamphlet" was apparently part of a larger work at some point in time. One section details Jewish intermarriages in Romania. The data states the ethnicity of the non-Jewish parent, broken down by county and sometimes city and the number of children resulting from mixed marriages (broken down also by ethnicity of the non-Jewish parent). Another section breaks down the Jewish population by sex and county/city and another by age and county/city. Graphs depict distribution by age and sex across the country. Bucharest's Jewish population is broken down separately. It is not clear who created these pages, whereas the maps state that they were created by the Centrala Evreilor din România.

This folder contains several pieces of miscellaneous correspondence related to several Makkabi (also spelled Macabi, today Maccabi) sports club branches in Romania. It is not clear what the connection is between the letters or how they ended up together and in this archival collection. In addition to reports from Romanian-based branches, there is a list of donations/dues (unclear) from Czech-based branches. On the verso is a fragment of a letter in German regarding Romanian-based Zionist work; the letter appears to refer to Zionist activities and not Makkabi events. Other letters include one from the Tel-Aviv Makkabi branch to Bucharest representatives (Dr. Weinberg). There is also a report, in German, addressed to the leadership of the Makkabi World Union (Weltverband) at the congress in Prague (1933) regarding activities in Romania; the report was written in Iași. There are several memos from and to the Chișinau branch (in Romanian and Hebrew) as well as to branches in Galați and Cernăuți (Chernivtsi/Czernowitz). These are written in Romania and are all from the same man, Hazack Weematz (also spelled Hazac Veemaț), apparently president of the Romanian Makkabi executive board.

The Jewish Communities of Romania Collection (sometimes also described by the Romanian National Archives as the Documents Collection of the Jewish Communities of Romania) contains documents created and received by Jewish communities and organizations functioning in Romania from the 19th century to the first half of the 20th century.

The documents until World War II are composed of a variety of items reflecting community life, including statutes, correspondence, reports, and membership lists. Documents from the World War II period generally address the plight of Romanian Jews during this period. This material includes reports on persecutions and expropriations, correspondence and other documents related to deportees, and emigration paperwork. The post-World War II material generally deals with the repatriation of Jewish deportees to the Romanian-organized camps in Transnistria, the welfare of survivors, emigration, and the activities of the Federation of Jewish Communities in Romania and of the Jewish Democratic Committee (communist Jewish organization). For the complete inventory list of the collection, please see this link (in Romanian only): http://www.arhivelenationale.ro/images/custom/image/Pdf-uri/DANIC_Fonduri%20si%20colectii/Feudale/Colectia%20comunitati%20evreiesti%201818-1959.pdf

JBAT archivists surveyed folders containing material related specifically to Bukovina and Transylvania. For details on the contents of these folders, please see the list below and click on any link.

This folder contains hundreds of documents apparently related in some way to the Transnistrian deportees in the county of Golta. The documents include corresponence with the Jewish council central offices in Bucharest, memos from the welfare department of assistance sent, inventories of goods sent, telegrams, private messages transmitted via the central council to individuals in Golta county. Many of these messages are from people in Cernăuți to relatives or friends deported to Golta.

This folder contains a variety of paperwork regarding Transnistrian deportees. A majority of the papers originate from Cernăuți and regard the impoverished Jewish community there. Material includes correspondence from the Jewish council to and from governmental authorities regarding Transnistrian deportees, medicine to be sent, border control of goods, and so forth. There are charts of businesses, presumably Jewish-owned, but the first page is missing and so the scope of the charts is not clear. Correspondence to and from the Cernăuți office primarily regards sums of money sent from the welfare department. There are also personal notes, memos, or telegrams (it is not clear) sent to deportees in Transnistria from various individuals or organizations in Bucharest.

This folder contains lists of Jews from various cities around the country who were deported to Transnistria as a result of infractions of forced labor requirements. The charts list the name of the individuals, address, parent names, and year of birth. The majority of the individuals in these lists are from Bucharest or other towns in the Regat. There are some shorter lists of individuals from Cernăuți, Timișoara, Alba Iulia, and a few other towns in Transylvania.

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