Search Results: 22 total

  • of 3
  • >

This folder contains correspondence and newsletters to and from Zionist organizations from numerous towns throughout Transylvania. The material is exclusively in Hungarian.

This folder contains two documents written by Bernard Kahana of Brașov in 1941. One is an introductory letter addressed to Fildermann, president of the Federation and with a signed note added (in Romanian) by Șafran, head rabbi at the time. The other is an extensive proposal by Kahana to establish a Jewish newspaper in Romania. It appears that Kahana owned a printing press or ran a newspaper which was shut down and seized in the wake of anti-Semitic laws and he is now proposing to found a paper which would be permitted under the new legal framework. The seven page, closely typed proposal is valuable as it sets out the situation at the time of Jews in Romania, the sudden importance of strong communal institutes, the changes wrought in Jewish consciousness since the start of the war and anti-Semitic legislation, and touches on many aspects of Jewish life, religious, secular, Zionist, etc. Everything is in German, indicating (presumably) Kahana's Transylvanian background and probably that he was not a fluent, or at least confident, Romanian speaker.

This folder contains a collection of documents apparently put together by the Federation of Jewish communities. All the documents testify to abuse of Jewish property or person in some way. Included is a testimony from Alba Iulia and a bill of sale (from a Jewish man to the Legionnaires) from Brașov.

The Jewish Communities of Romania Collection (sometimes also described by the Romanian National Archives as the Documents Collection of the Jewish Communities of Romania) contains documents created and received by Jewish communities and organizations functioning in Romania from the 19th century to the first half of the 20th century.

The documents until World War II are composed of a variety of items reflecting community life, including statutes, correspondence, reports, and membership lists. Documents from the World War II period generally address the plight of Romanian Jews during this period. This material includes reports on persecutions and expropriations, correspondence and other documents related to deportees, and emigration paperwork. The post-World War II material generally deals with the repatriation of Jewish deportees to the Romanian-organized camps in Transnistria, the welfare of survivors, emigration, and the activities of the Federation of Jewish Communities in Romania and of the Jewish Democratic Committee (communist Jewish organization). For the complete inventory list of the collection, please see this link (in Romanian only): http://www.arhivelenationale.ro/images/custom/image/Pdf-uri/DANIC_Fonduri%20si%20colectii/Feudale/Colectia%20comunitati%20evreiesti%201818-1959.pdf

JBAT archivists surveyed folders containing material related specifically to Bukovina and Transylvania. For details on the contents of these folders, please see the list below and click on any link.

The collection includes the paperwork and material collected by the Brașov county Securitate (Romanian Communist Secret Police) offices under communism. The material includes select folders from the pre-communist period; these folders were presumably in the possession of the police and seized by the Securitate at some point in time. There are many hundreds of folders which are obliquely titled or refer to a place or general content related to "minorities" or "religion" but give no indication as to the details of the contents. At the time of the JBAT survey (2015), the inventory for this collection was accesible only at the physical location of the CNSAS and only in digital form on the computers of the CNSAS reading room. The inventory provided no indication as to the linear extent of the collection and gave no additional details as to its history, content, or the number of pages in individual folders. For details on folders titled as specifically containing material related to the Jewish population, please click on the link(s) below.

This folder contains budget reports, charts, and related correspondence from the Jewish communities in Brașov (both Neologue and Orthodox) as well as from some of their ancillary organizations (women's organization, etc) and the community of Ploiești, evacuated to Brașov.

This entry is for multiple folders; each contains a declaration for an individual from Brașov applying to be exempted from forced labor. The document includes birth data, employment and educational informate. For the names of individuals applying, please see the National Archives online guide to this collection (https://drive.google.com/drive/u/0/folders/0B54MeDlSJl3IMXVrTkFLMEhtVXM, only in Romanian) and consult the folder (dosar) number listed under the call number of this entry.

The headings and entries in this register book are in Hungarian, sometimes supplemental information regarding the individual's death is in Romanian. Information recorded includes name of child, names of parents, residence, date of birth, sex, legitimate or illigitimate, midwife name, mohel name and date of circumcision or name-giving (in the case of a girl), names of witnesses or godparents. Sometimes date and circumstances of death, marriage, or name change are also included. Entries are not always comprehensive. Due to state archival regulations, later birth entries may not be accessed. At the time of this survey, births until 1912 were accessible. The register itself apparently records births until 1950 (could not be verified). This book was created by Brasov's Neologue (reform) community. Please also see the birth book for the Ortodox Community.

The headings in this register book are in Hungarian, entries are initially in German and later in Hungarian. Information recorded includes name of child, names of parents, residence, date of birth, sex, legitimate or illigitimate, midwife name, mohel name and date of circumcision or name-giving (in the case of a girl), names of witnesses or godparents. Sometimes date and circumstances of death are also included. At the end of the register book are loose leaves including individual birth certificates and other related material. There is also a typed letter (in German) from the Constanta Jewish Community thanking the Brasov Orthodox Community for its donation in support of refugees (date 1941). Due to state archival regulations, later birth entries may not be accessed. At the time of this survey, births until 1913 were accessible. The register itself apparently records births until 1939 (could not be verified); the loose leaves of paper date into the 1940s.

The headings in this book are in German, entries are generally also made in German, but the "comments" or "death" notes are sometimes in Hungarian or Romanian (added decades after original entry). Information recorded includes name of child, names of parents, residence, date of birth, sex, legitimate or illigitimate, midwife name, mohel name and date of circumcision or name-giving (in the case of a girl), names of witnesses or godparents. Sometimes date and circumstances of death are also included. The register is for the Orthodox Jewish Community. Interestingly, about one third of the births are to village families, appearing to indicate that the village Jews were more inclined to Orthodoxy than their urban coreligionists. At the end of the book are several loose sheets including death certificates and a certificate of conversion (to Roman Catholicism) made in 1944 in Oradea (northern Translyvania). The register itself contains entries until 1885; the loose sheets are from the 1940s.

  • of 3
  • >

We welcome your input about our site.
Help us out by taking a quick, 7-question survey.