Search Results: 55 total

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Please note JBAT archivists did not survey this material directly. The folder description provided by the CNSAS inventory reads: Informative memo regarding Israeli tourists and their relationships to various Romanian citizens.

Please note JBAT archivists did not survey this material directly. The folder description provided by the CNSAS inventory reads: Investigations, memos and informative reports, personal identity documents, notifications regarding the activities of Romanian citizens with ties to foreign countries or who want to emigrate from the country (especially to Israel); report with proposals of compromise and isolation of Abramovici Luhar from Câmpulung Moldovenesc.

The collection includes the paperwork and material collected by the Suceava county Securitate (Romanian Communist Secret Police) offices under communism. The material includes select folders from the pre-communist period; these folders were presumably in the possession of the police and seized by the Securitate at some point in time. At the time of the JBAT survey (2015), the inventory for this collection was accesible only at the physical location of the CNSAS and only in digital form on the computers of the CNSAS reading room. The inventory provided no indication as to the linear extent of the collection and gave no additional details as to its history, content, or the number of pages in individual folders. The collection is large, over 1,000 files, and as such there are many hundreds of folders which are obliquely titled and may contain reference to Jewish residents, for example folders titled as dealing with religious issues or the nationality of residents or folders regarding the monitoring of individuals with relatives in the United States, of tourists in the region or of Romanians with ties to foreigners. It was beyond the scope of the present survey to inspect the contents of all such folders. There are, however, a number of folders with titles specifically referencing the Jewish content. Several of these contain material related to specific Jewish communities; others regard surveillance carried out in Jewish communities or on persons hoping to emigrate. For details on these folders and others with material clearly related to the Jewish population, please click on the link(s) below.

This collection consists of court dossiers pertaining to various civil cases, the vast majority involving inheritance, and a considerable amount relating to property cases, contracts, and the issuing or release of records and certificates. The property cases cover the broadest range of topics, ranging from cases concerning recognition or establishment of ownership, eviction, destruction or damage to the property, and the sale or surrender of property from one party to another. The contract cases typically involve the cancellation of or release from a contract, or various claims about breaches of contractual obligations. Owing to the considerable size of the Jewish population in the Câmpulung district, a substantial number of these cases involve Jewish individuals and companies or banks with Jewish owners. A number of the cases from the 1940s appear to relate to the seizing or redistribution of Jewish property around the time of the deportations. For example, in 1940 there is a notable spike in cases involving the striking of claims or of debts relating to properties, and in 1942 there are correspondence and documents relating to the redrawing of property books. 1943 features several property and financial cases involving the Centrul Național de Românizare București (National Center for Romanianization). Beginning in 1944 and 1945 there are a number of cases involving Jewish individuals seeking “recognition of ownership” of property. As the majority of these cases concern property, access is generally restricted. Special permission is required to view the majority of these cases.

The collection contains various administrative and financial papers and correspondence, as well as some registers of students and matriculation records, but the student body and staff, at least during the years covered by the collection (1939-1950), do not appear to have included any Jews. However, dosar 25/1941 concerns the acquisition by the school of property and furniture seized from Jewish owner(s).

This register contains handwritten German entries in a printed book. The register lists name of the deceased, date of death, date of burial, address of deceased, age, and cause of death.

This register contains handwritten German entries in a printed book. Name of child, date of birth, address of residence, name of parents, godparents, midwife, and mohel, as well as address of maternal grandparents are listed. Following the entries are amendments and corrections. A few corrections and additions in Romanian from later decades are also present.

This register contains handwritten German entries in a printed book. Name of child, date of birth, address of residence, name of parents, godparents, midwife, and mohel, as well as address of maternal grandparents are listed. Following the entries are amendments and corrections. A few corrections and additions in Romanian from later decades are also present.

This register contains handwritten German entries in a printed book. Name of child, date of birth, address of residence, name of parents, godparents, midwife, and mohel, as well as address of maternal grandparents are listed. Following the entries are amendments and corrections. A few corrections and additions in Romanian from later decades are also present.

This register contains handwritten German entries in a printed book. Name of child, date of birth, address of residence, name of parents, godparents, midwife, and mohel, as well as address of maternal grandparents are listed. Following the entries are amendments and corrections. A few corrections and additions in Romanian from later decades are also present.

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