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This manuscript can be found within the collection of the Rădăuți Girls School Nr. 2. Though not specifically referring to the Jewish population it offers a fascinating reflection of the shifting realities in Rădăuți from the pre-World War I period until the end of the 1930s. Written more as a diary, it records events affecting the school including the breakout of World War I, epidemics, and Romania's unification. There are also pages with the signatures of pupils in each class. It appears to have been attended exclusively by Romanians and thus, if it really was part of school Nr. 2 (and was not miscatalogued), then it must have functioned in some way as a separate body as the other records from this school demonstrate a diverse student body. More likely, it was part of school Nr. 1 and was miscatalogued in the Nr. 2 collection

This manuscript was created in 1883/1884 on the occasion of the 100th year anniversary of the German school in Suceava. Affixed to the first page is a booklet printed for the anniversary celebration. It recounts the festive events held for the anniversary and reprints the speech made by the school director, Michael Schwetz. This speech describes in some detail the founding of the school in 1784. Prior to this date there had been a small Romanian-Orthodox school and an Armenian-Orthodox school which trained the children mainly in religion. These schools were incorporated into the Stadtschule (city school) building, as it was called when it first opened, but they still operated separately, especially in terms of language of instruction. In 1815 a new building was constructed and new teachers were brought in, including, according to Schwetz ”a Jewish teacher for the Jewish children.” Later the Romanian-Orthodox school dissolved entirely and the students were incorporated into the German school. The Armenian-Orthodox school, on the other hand, separated and continued its classes in a different building as a private school. Schwetz then recalls various teachers over the years and also describes the high regard in which the school was held in the eyes of the entire southern Bukovina region. After Schwetz's speech a Romanian pupil wearing the national folk costume recited a poem praising the Habsburgs and other ceremonies honoring Maria Theresa, Josef I, and Franz Josef were held with poems being recited by four boys: a Romanian, Pole, German, and Armenian. The last page of the booklet is a fold-out page listing the names and religion of all the directors, teachers, and assistant teachers employed by the school from 1774-1884. Up until this time the staff was mostly German and Polish, though there are also Romanian, Armenian, and Jewish names. The booklet is available in full on this website. The handwritten part of the manuscript was probably recorded by the respective school director and reports on the ethnic make-up of the student body for each year, lists teachers, events in school life, and political events. The last pages of the book are set up as a staff register (not comprehensive) which includes the vital information for the teacher, their education, training, and past experience.

The Iacobeni school collection contains just one item, a manuscript describing the development of the Romanian school, which opened in 1871. Prior to that German language schools had existed since 1813. The manuscript deals primarily with matters of Romanian education and nationalism but also occasionally mentions the other ethnic groups in the small town. It also includes a history of the locality and records other major events affecting the community include the World Wars, unification, etc.

The photographs associated with manuscript numbers 45-48 include photographs from the 1980s of former students and staff of the Siret State Lyceum as well as photographs of students and staff from the 1920s-1930s.

This manuscript and the four related manuscripts (Numbers 45-49) deal with the history of the Siret State Lyceum. All contents come from former students. The Lyceum was primarily a Romanian school but some Jewish students also attended. In general the authors refer little or not at all to the Jewish students, but their names are included and some of them may be found in the photograph album (cataloged by the Suceava archives as manuscript Nr. 49). The recounting of the school history and the two volumes of memoirs are quite extensive, these items will be interesting for users who are confident that relatives or friends attended this school or who are interested in researching the cultural and educational program of interwar Romania as it related to nation building. The photographs may also be of some interest for those studying Jewish assimilation to Romanian culture rather than German within the Bukovina.

This manuscript and the four related manuscripts (Numbers 45-49) deal with the history of the Siret State Lyceum. All contents come from former students. The Lyceum was primarily a Romanian school but some Jewish students also attended. In general the authors refer little or not at all to the Jewish students, but their names are included and some of them may be found in the photograph album (cataloged by the Suceava archives as manuscript Nr. 49). The retelling of the history and the two volumes of memoirs are quite extensive, these items will be interesting for users who are confident that relatives or friends attended this school or who are interested in researching the cultural and educational program of interwar Romania as it related to nation building.

This manuscript and the four related manuscripts (Numbers 45-49) deal with the history of the Siret State Lyceum. All contents come from former students. The Lyceum was primarily a Romanian school but some Jewish students also attended. In general the authors refer little or not at all to the Jewish students, but their names are included and some of them may be found in the photograph album (cataloged by the Suceava archives as manuscript Nr. 49). The retelling of the history and the two volumes of memoirs are quite extensive, these items will be interesting for users who are confident that relatives or friends attended this school or who are interested in researching the cultural and educational program of interwar Romania as it related to nation building.

This manuscript and the four related manuscripts (Numbers 45-49) deal with the history of the Siret State Lyceum. All content comes from former students. The Lyceum was primarily a Romanian school but some Jewish students also attended. In general the authors refer little or not at all to the Jewish students, but their names are included and some of them may be found in the photograph album (cataloged by the Suceava archives as manuscript Nr. 49). The retelling of the history and the two volumes of memoirs are quite extensive; these items will be interesting for users who are confident that relatives or friends attended this school or who are interested in researching the cultural and educational program of interwar Romania as it related to nation building.

The diaries were written by Demeter Hackmann, originally of Ciudeiu in Bukovina, commander of the K.u.K.(royal and imperial) Infantry regiment Hindenburg No. 69. In addition to recording day-to-day maneuvers and battles, the diary has hand-drawn color maps and lists of other officers, including many Jewish names. An obituary for Hackmann is affixed to the last page of the diary.

The manuscript consists of self-selected excerpts from the Jahrbuch des Bukowiner Landes-Museums and focuses primarily on medieval and early modern history of the city of Suceava, emphasizing Romanian personalities. The last pages contains transcriptions of documents from the mid-1700s regulating the location of Jewish houses and buildings and their activities. Translated from the German by Ilia Țabrea. Originally published in ”Jahrbuch des Bukowiner Landes-Museums”.

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