Search Results: 26 total

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This school had some Jewish students, though proportionately the reform school had more. According to the preface in the National Archives inventory for this collection, this school was opened in 1836. It remained small (with 1-2 teachers) until the second half of the 19th century when it was able to construct its own building. By this time it had classes for both boys and girls. The majority of the material is in Hungarian; beginning in the post-Trianon period some of the material is also in Romanian. Most of the items are class register books with data on the pupils' backgrounds, grades, absences, and so forth and most registers date from the 20th century, though there are 15-20 items from the 19th century. Student register books will contain birth date and place of the pupil and information on the parents' occupations, mother tongue, nationality, and religion. The school was closed in 1948 in the wake of the restructuring of the Romanian school system under communism.

This school appears to have been attended primarily by Hungarians and Jews. The Jewish proportion of the students may have reached up to 20-25% at certain periods. The school was opened in 1860 but did not become well-established, with funds necessary to construct its own building and employ sufficient teaching staff until the end of the 19th century. There are a total of 78 items in the collection, all but two of them are from the 20th century. The oldest item dates to 1893 and is a registration book. Beginning in 1909 the records are, for the most part, comprehensive and without gaps and include class registers, grade books, and curriculum registers. Sometime after 1900 the girls were taught separately from the boys. The vast majority of the material is in Hungarian, though some of the registers in the post-Trianon period are titled in Hungarian and Romanian. Record books generally include information on the pupil's birth date and place, parents, their occupations, mother tongue, residence, nationality, and religion.

This collection has only one item, a folder of correspondence and miscellaneous written material, for the most part from or to the school director. There are several hundreds pages and included is a chart of the ethnic and religious breakdown of the students in 1892. According to the chart, approximately 10% of the student body was Jewish, though overwhelmingly female.

This collection consists of only one item: a registration book for the members of the Reghin Chevra Kadisha. The book is in Hebrew and Hungarian. The Hebrew year in which the individual joined is included and on a few occasions, there are additional notes on the individual (in Hungarian). The book itself has a print date of 1904 but dates of membership reach back to the 1850s. The final entries were made in the 1930s.

This collection contains papers created by the Jewish Democratic Committee for the county of Mureș and town of Târgu Mureș and for the local branch of Reghin. The folders contain meeting minutes, reports, surveys, and other written material. It is not clear how the county of Mureș differed from the region of Mureș (there is also a collection for the Regional Jewish Democratic Committee for Mureș). The committee had a wide range of responsibilities, surpassing basic political tasks. The reports and meetings record decisions about secular and religious holidays, the Jewish school, teachers, emigration matters, unresolved events (missing persons) from World War II, religious staff (butcher, teachers), cultural events, and general happenings in community life. There are surveys on the community, including data on community numbers, language, occupations, and so forth. There are reports on the receptiveness to communist ideology versus Zionism and specific numbers are given for those who have requested to emigrate. There may also be speeches made by the leadership on holidays or for other gatherings. The collection may be of interest to those studying Jewish life in the immediate post-war period and especially those looking at questions of identity, Zionism, and Jewish roles in early communist Romania.

Please note that the inventory for this collection was missing in 2015, so the precise contents are not known. Two folders were requested, one dealt with the regional committee, as per the title of the collection; the other folder was from the Sighișoara committee. The folders contain meeting minutes, reports, surveys, and other written material created by the Jewish Democratic Committee for the region of Mureș (or Sighișoara). It is not clear how the region of Mureș differed from the county of Mureș (there is also a collection for the Jewish Democratic Committee for Mureș County). The committee had a wide range of responsibilities, surpassing basic political tasks. The reports and meetings record decisions about secular and religious holidays, the Jewish school, teachers, emigration matters, unresolved events (missing persons) from World War II, religious staff (butcher, teachers), cultural events, and general happenings in community life. There are surveys on the community, including data on community numbers, language, occupations, and so forth. There are reports on the surrounding towns and the respective population's receptiveness to communist ideology versus Zionism. There may also be speeches made by the leadership on holidays or for other gatherings. The collection may be of interest to those studying Jewish life in the immediate post-war period and especially those looking at questions of identity, Zionism, and Jewish roles in early communist Romania.

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