Search Results: 26 total

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Folder contains miscellaneous documents regarding collectivization measures, friendship with the USSR, workers holidays, and so forth. There is one "confidential" memo regarding a change of usage for prayer houses or synagogues and stating that no changes of usage are allowed.

This folder contains governmental forms for religious conversions. Included are two conversions from Lutheranism to Judaism, a husband and wife. Date 1945.

The folder contains lists of properties owned by the city and churches, including property of the Jewish community. It is unclear why the synagogue and cemeteries are not included on these property lists. There is also correspondence regarding the desire of the Orthodox church and town hall to construct a new cemetery and the response from the neighbors, who opposed this measure (including some Jewish neighbors). There is likewise a report from a health official advising against the new construction of a Jewish cemetery for the same reasons (as given by the neighbors who opposed the Orthodox cemetery).

The folder contains requests and petitions from various organizations and individuals in Reghin to the Town Hall. There are notes from or to Zionist organizations and the Jewish community.

Please note that this collection comprises three inventories: "Primaria Orasului Reghin" (1829-1950) with 704 items; Sfatul Popular al Orasului Reghin (1951-1955) with 111 items; and Consiliul Popular al Orasului Reghin (1950-1968) with 634 items. These titles reflect the changes of governmental organisation within the country. The present survey focused primarily on the contents of the first inventory. The material within the second two inventories deals largely with the restructuring under communism and rarely do the contents move beyond bureaucratic and administrative announcements and records. The first inventory however contains numerous files with information relevant to Jewish history. The collection contains material customary for a municipal authority including administrative and financial files, documents regarding permits and professions, and regulating schools, religious institutes, and so forth. Specific to the Jewish population, there are files with material on synagogues, Jewish organizations, Jewish professionals and apprentices, and numerous files regarding Jewish citizenship or property of Jews who were deported or emigrated. For details on these files and others with material related specifically to the Jewish population of Reghin, please see below and click on any title.

This register is entirely in Hungarian. Though the book is catalogued under Reghin and was certainly maintained there, many or even most of the individuals appear to be from neighboring villages. Thus, even half a century after the laws were changed to allow Jews to live in towns, the community was still overwhelmingly rural. On the other hand, much more so than in the record books from smaller settlements in the region, in this book you do see marriages taking place between individuals from Reghin and those from larger towns, including towns with a Saxon presence such as Brașov and Făgăraș. The proximity to northern Transylvania and Maramureș is also indicated in the frequency of individuals from such towns as Beclean. Information recorded is: Name and birthplace of the bride and groom, parents' names and place of residence, age and status (single, widowed, divorced) of bride and groom, date and place of the wedding, officiant's name.

This register is entirely in Hungarian, with a few names written in Hebrew by certain scribes. Though the book is catalogued under Reghin and was certainly maintained there, most of the individuals appear to be from neighboring villages. Thus, even half a century after the laws were changed to allow Jews to live in towns, perhaps half or even a majority of the Jewish births were occurring in rural villages.

This register is in Hungarian and Hebrew (some names and dates). It contains much less information than other death registers, namely only the name (Hungarian and Hebrew), date of death, and place of stone in the cemetery. In fact, it is more likely that this book was a register for the cemetery rather than the official death register, which normally included information regarding the deceased's place and date of birth, occupation, cause of death, and so forth.

This collection comprises civil registers recording birth, marriage, and death records. Originally the registers were kept by each respective parish, church, synagogue, etc. In the 1950s they were collected by the National Archives and made into this overarching collection. The collection is organized by locality and then religion. In addition to birth, marriage, and death records, some of the Christian registers record conversions, baptisms, confirmations, pastor or priest names, and other notes on the development of the community. The Romanian preface to the collection notes that in 1784 the Jewish communities were made to record their civil records under the supervision of the Catholic priests. It is unclear whether this may indicate that 18th century Jewish records might be found within Catholic record books. In any case, there are no extant Jewish registers prior to 1815. Of interest in this civil record collection in the county of Mureș are the numerous registers from rural areas, especially from the area around the small town of Sângeorgiu de Pădure, also the region of the socalled Szekely Sabbatarians. All Jewish registers held at the Mureș archives are described in detail below.

This collection has four inventories. The first inventory, nr. 171, lists 279 items which for the most part are of an administrative nature or class newspapers. There are also a few class registers and various other registers which mostly refer to staff affairs. A student register book from the 1930s shows many Jews attending the school, alongside Romanian and Hungarians. Of particular interest amongst the items in this inventory are those administrative documents from the interwar period and especially following World War I in which nation-building and Romanianization measures are discussed. The second inventory, nr. 996, lists 155 items. The majority are class immatriculation registers and grade books, though there is also meeting minutes and budgetary and administrative paperwork. This inventory contains papers dating 1919-1948. The third inventory, nr. 1359, contains 26 items, dating 1920-1940. Of particular interest here are the annual school reports, which exist from 1920-1935, and which contain breakdowns of the student body by ethnicity and religion. In 1927, for example, Jews made up 25% of the student body. The other items in this inventory are administrative in nature. Finally, inventory nr. 1442, contains 16 items, dating from 1914-1941. The items in this inventory belonged to the former director of the school, Valeriu Boeriu. They consist primarily of personal momentos, photographs, manuscripts, and other items related to Boeriu's period as director (1914-1941).

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