Search Results: 22 total

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The headings in this book are in German and Hungarian, but all entries are made in German. Information recorded includes name of child, names of parents, residence, date of birth, sex, legitimate or illigitimate, midwife name, mohel name and date of circumcision or name-giving (in the case of a girl), names of witnesses or godparents. Sometimes date and circumstances of death are also included and certain years include the birthplace of both parents in addition to their names. This record book is for the Neologue (Reform) community. See also the birth register for the Brașov Orthodox Community.

This is the first birth record book that exists for the community. Information recorded includes name of child, names of parents, residence, date of birth, sex, legitimate or illigitimate, midwife name, mohel name and date of circumcision or name-giving (in the case of a girl), names of witnesses or godparents. Both the printed matter and the handwritten entries are in German; entries are for the years 1851-1873. At the end of the book are 32 leaves of handwritten pages, dated 1900. The pages appear to be an index to this birth book as well as a later one (entries continue into the late 1890s, 25 years after the register book ends). These sheets are headed in Hungarian and are alphabetical, recording the name, entry number in the respective birth book, and birth date.

This register records deaths for the Neologue Jewish community of Brasov. The Jewish community split into Orthodox and Neologue factions in the late 1870s. The register records date of death, name and occupation of deceased, gender, marital status, age, parents' names, name of marriage partner still living, circumstances of death (place, cause) place and date of burial. At the time of survey (2014), only records dating to 1937 were accessible to the public due to Romanian archival regulations.

This register records deaths for the Orthodox Jewish community of Brasov. The Jewish community split into Orthodox and Neologue factions in the late 1870s. The register records date of death, name and occupation of deceased, gender, marital status, age, parents' names, name of marriage partner still living, circumstances of death (place, cause) place and date of burial. At the time of survey (2014), only records dating to 1937 were accessible to the public due to Romanian archival regulations.

This register records deaths from the Jewish community of Brasov. The printed register titles are in German and Hungarian, the handwritten entries are in German. Information listed includes date of death, name and occupation of deceased, gender, marital status, age, parents' names, name of marriage partner still living, place (including address) of death, cause of death, place and date of burial. There appears to have been a chicken-pox epidemic during the winter and spring of 1874. This registry ends when the community split into Neologue and Orthodox factions.

This register records deaths from the Jewish community in Brasov. The contents contains first and last name of deceased, date of death, birth place, occupation (not always completed), sex, marital status, age, place of death with address (not always completed), place of burial, cause of death, additional comments (rarely completed). There are several deaths of people born in Bodola in the 18th century, including one woman, Catharina Fischmann, who died at age 94, and was born in Bodola. She is listed as the widow of a Brandtweinbrenner. Bodola was home to a family of the Hungarian nobility; it seems that there was a small Jewish community (just several families, most likely) there perhaps by the mid 18th century, several generations before Brasov's community was founded.

This register records marriage from the Neologue Jewish community of Brasov. At the time of survey (2014), only records dating to 1937 were accessible to the public due to Romanian archival regulations. Entries are fairly complete until 1896, after which just the names and residence of bride and groom are entered plus date and place of the wedding. Prior to 1896 entries contained data as typical for earlier record books including data regarding the parents of the couple, birthplace, occupation, witnesses, official, etc. Until about 1920, all entries are recorded in Hungarian, after which they are in Romanian with parent names recorded in Hebrew below the name of the bride and grooom. Around this time entries again become more complete.

This register appears to be from the Orthodox Jewish community of Brasov. The entries were not comprehensively made, only some of the information is completed. All contents except the first page is in Hungarian. For marriage records for the Neologue community, see marriage record book with code 1-161.

This register, which overlaps in time period with another from Brasov, records marriages within the Jewish Orthodox community in Brasov. At this time (1877) the Jews of Brasov split into two official communities, a reform-minded Neologue commmunity (apparently the majority, based on the number of marriages) and a conservative Orthodox community. There were also two synagogues, as the Orthodox community records marriages taking place within the Orthodox synagogue, whereas the other books record marriages taking place within the "Temple." Data recorded is typical: name, occupation, birth place of the groom, parent names, residence, age, marital status (single, widowed, divorced), the same for the bride, date and place of wedding, how often the engagement was announced, names of witnesses and official who performed the ceremony.

This register is mistakenly labeled with the dates 1874-1879, but entries in fact continue to 1887. Though the printed titles are in Hungarian and German, the entries are all made in German. Data provided is typical and includes name, occupation, birth place of the groom, his parents' names and residence, age, whether single, widowed, or divorced, the same data for the bride, date and location of the wedding, names of witnesses and rabbi or official who performed the ceremony. Also included is where the engagement was announced and how many times the announcement was made (three times was the law).

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