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This folder contains several separate items in random order. The following description is given in chronological order, but items are not chronological in the folder. There are several handwritten sheets recording, in German, births, marriages, and deaths in the Jewish community of Alba Iulia in 1875. There are also two loose, handwritten leaves of paper stating there was one marriage and no deaths in 1885 in Alvincz. Then, there are printed logs of births, marriages, and deaths in 1886 with handwritten entries. For each event (birth, marriage or death), there are two set of logs, one for the town of Alba Iulia, one for the region around Alba Iulia. These are in Hungarian. Due to the range of recording methods, the biographical information in the forms is inconsistent. In general though, birth dates and place, parent information, and details of the respective event are recorded.

This item records deaths in the Jewish community of Alba Iulia. The book is in Hungarian. The entries are completed inconsistently: name and birth information of the deceased; occupation; age; surviving relatives; date, place, and circumstances of death; place, date, and officiant of the burial ceremony should be recorded but the data actually recorded depends on the scribe at the time.

This item records deaths in the area surrounding Alba Iulia; please note it is catalogued as being from Alba Iulia. The register was, probably, maintained in Alba Iulia. This may also explain why it seems somewhat haphazardly kept, note that many of the villages represented have their own records books (see other entries for the Jewish civil records in the county of Alba Iulia). The book is in Hungarian. The entries are completed inconsistently: name and birth information of the deceased; occupation; age; surviving relatives; date, place, and circumstances of death; place, date, and officiant of the burial ceremony should be recorded but rarely are all fields completed. Please note that for all intents and purposes the register ends in 1902, after this there is one entry for 1931.

This item records deaths in the Alba Iulia Jewish community from 1850-1886. The book is primarily in German (headings and entries), with Hungarian used more frequently beginning in the 1880s. The entries are not completed comprehensively, in general only the name; date of death; age; and gender are provided. Beginning around 1877 entries start to include names of surviving relatives; place and cause of death; and place and date of burial.

This item records marriages in Alba Iulia from 1886-1938. The book is in Hungarian. The entries are generally not completed comprehensively, various information particularly pertaining to the parents of the bride and groom is often missing. Name and birth information for the bride and groom; parent names and occupation; age; where announcement of engagement took place; place and date of the ceremony; and names of witnesses and officiant are supposed to have been recorded.

This item records marriages in the area surrounding Alba Iulia; please note it is catalogued as being from Alba Iulia. The register was, probably, maintained in Alba Iulia. This may also explain why it seems somewhat haphazardly kept, note that many of the villages represented have their own records books (see other entries for the Jewish civil records in the county of Alba Iulia). The book is in Hungarian. The entries are completed fairly well, with name and birth information for the bride and groom; parent names and occupation; age; where announcement of engagement took place; place and date of the ceremony; and names of witnesses and officiant recorded.

This register recorded marriages in the Jewish community of Alba Iulia. The book is German. The entries are generally not comprehensively completed and only include name of bride and groom; age; place of residence; place and date of marriage and officiant. Information on parents; occupation; and other customarily recorded data is generally left blank.

This register recorded births in the Jewish community of Alba Iulia. The book is primarily in Hungarian with some Hebrew dates and names provided. Entries after World War I are sometimes in Romanian. Name; date; gender; parents; marital status of parents; parent residence; midwife name; circumcision or naming ceremony details and name of witnesses or godparents are provided. The birth of Hungarian-language author Bernat Klärmann (Benő Karácsonyi) is recorded in this book on sheet 14.

Please note this item is catalogued as births of the community in Alba Iulia, but in fact almost none of the births took place in Alba Iulia, rather in the villages and small towns surrounding the city. The register was, perhaps, maintained in Alba Iulia, and was supposed to record births in the district. This may also explain why it seems somewhat haphazardly kept. Note that there are many gaps in the entries, they are not consistent from 1886-1933; in particular after the turn of the century entries are far less frequent. The book is primarily in Hungarian with some Hebrew dates and names provided. Entries after World War I are sometimes in Romanian. Name; date; gender; parents; marital status of parents; parent residence; midwife name; circumcision or naming ceremony details and name of witnesses or godparents are provided.

The origins of this register are not entirely clear. It appears to be a compilation of multiple register books, both from Alba Iulia and the surrounding area. The title page states that it is a copy of the registers of births in Alba Iulia and the surrounding area from 1850 to 1895; this statement is in Romanian and is signed and dated 1941. The following entries, however, made in German (with Hungarian in the "remarks" column, generally regarding marriage, name change or death), do not appear to date from 1941, rather earlier, possibly at the time of the event. The initial entries are chronological and generally not comprehensive - they generally include only date of birth, name of child and parents and, in the case of boys, date of circumcision. Beginning in the mid/late 1870s, the entries become more comprehensive and include midwife names, date of name giving (for girls), and names of witnesses. The vast majority of these births take place in Alba Iulia, though there are isolated cases of births in many of the surrounding villages and towns. This section concludes with an official signature by the rabbi in 1886. Following this (sheet 87) begins a "Nachtrag" section, birth entries made after the fact. It appears this is now a record of birth information for all community members who were not in the previous section. Many of these births did not take place in Alba Iulia, they are no longer chronological and sometimes by family. The earliest birth noted in 1836. Following this, chronological births begin again, for the year 1886. Note that the first page has a Hungarian overlay of the titles (which are printed in German) but it has been affixed to the wrong page (presumably by archivists at a later point in time) and the column headings do not correspond with the contents. The births now proceed chronologically; of interest is that the scribes added columns recording the birthplace of the mother and father and as such one can get an impression of regional movement trends. Many of the fathers came from other established communities such as Targu Mures, Lviv, Ploiesti, Arad, Bistrita, Aiud, Fagaras, Cluj and so forth. Next, comes once more entries for births taking place much earlier, the earliest being 1841. After several pages of this, another new section begins, this time arranged by village. The entries are in a mixture of German and Hungarian. Apparently in 1885, the Jewish residents of each village were recorded here by family. Villages included are (in order of entry): Vințul de Jos (Alvinc) with Borberek; Nagy Igen with some neighboring villages; Galtin, Coslarin, Cricau, Stimbru, Oiesda (Galto, Koslard, Krakko, Szt Imre, Vajasd) (this section has births recorded from 1804 on and includes births in Alba Iulia and other towns, probably individuals were members of the respective village at the time of recording); Oarda de Jos (includes notes on marriages and deaths as well). Following this is yet another section - a handwritten copy of item XXX Matrikel Kis Enyed, also in the Alba Iulia national archives. This records families in villages in the Kis Enyed district. Please see the entry for that item for more details.

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