Search Results: 55 total

  • <
  • of 6
  • >

This register contains handwritten German entries with printed Latin titles. Corrections, updates, and errata from later years are in Romanian. Content lists name of child and parents, including mother's maiden name, address, date of birth, date of circumcision, sex of child, name of midwife, and names of witnesses.

This is a collection of records of birth, marriage, and death, usually in the form of register books kept by religious officials. The collection is arranged alphabetically by the name of the locality, and then if applicable subdivided into subparts by religious denomination. Depending on the time period and on the size of the congregation, birth, marriage, and death registers may consist of separate volumes or be contained in a single volume. Please note that this collection consists of register books for localities within the boundaries of Suceava county, established after the second World War. Suceava County (Județ) includes all of Southern Bukovina (i.e. the part of Austrian Bukovina now within Romania's boundaries), as well as some additional territories which were never part of the Austrian province of Bukovina. For details on the Jewish community record books contained within this collection, please see the links below.

This unusual file contains documents pertaining to the murder by decapitation of an older (73 years old) Jewish woman by two men. The documents are statements made by the police and confessions of the perpetrators. The crime took place in Capu Câmpului (a village).

The file contains correspondence regarding foreigners, many of whom are former Romanian citizens who lost or renounced their citizenship during the course of the 1930s and World War II. There are also documents related to Transnistria including ones containing information on the return of people from Transnistria.

This collection contains records created by the gendarmes of Câmpulung Moldovenesc during the interwar period and World War II. The collection contains various files on spy and sabatoge activities and the movements or activities of foreigners, religious sects, political groups, and so forth, though few of these deal directly with the Jewish population. Folders with specifically Jewish content include one with information related to Transnistria survivors and a curious folder regarding the murder by decapitation of a local Jewish woman. For details on these items, please see below.

These charts do not contain addresses but they do contain a list of names, presumably head of family, and the number of people living with them. There are over 2,000 individuals listed. The file also contains a petition from Mendel Wassermann and Iossel Tartar requesting permission to construct an engine for their mill.

This file contains correspondence and reports regarding preparations and organization of the local militia in Câmpulung Moldovenesc, whose headquarters was at the Maier Kismann factory. There are multiple bulletins regarding preparations to be made but also lists of personnel, including their ethnic breakdown. At the beginning Jews are represented equally or even over-represented in the make-up of the militia leadership; the documents at the end of the file contain only Romanian names.

This file contains various witness statements and declarations from town halls or other civil register sources regarding individuals applying to receive Romanian citizenship. All of the individuals in the file are Jewish who lost their Romanian citizenship in the course of the anti-Semitic legislation of the late 1930s. In addition to witness statements and official confirmations of birth, etc, there are forms completed by the individuals applying which includes data regarding their birth, parents, and war-time location (Transnistria, work camps, etc). Names of applicants include Zoltan, Feuerwerger, Gluzer, Wieder.

Contrary to its description in the inventory of the Suceava archives, this file contains documents spanning the late 1930s to the early 1940s (not just 1941). Most of the correspondence is from federal authorities requesting information regarding possession of property in the town and county, especially church property. Few of the responses presumably dispatched by the Câmpulung authorities are included, though it is possible these may be found in archival repositories in Bucharest. Information requested included architectural plans and other cadastral data and is potentially of significant interest. There is one letter from the Chevra Gach synagogue association. The last pages of the file date from 1938 and contain various inspection reports made by the Câmpulung sanitation office in which they order individuals to repair, tear down, clean, or otherwise alter existing structures on private property. All of the individuals receiving such citations are Jewish residents.

This file contains a comprehensive list of all shopkeepers and artisans in Câmpulung Moldovenesc in 1917. The list contains 160 names, along with the respective individual's trade and tax levied. The file also contains several applications for reimbursement of losses or damages suffered on account of the war.

  • <
  • of 6
  • >

We welcome your input about our site.
Help us out by taking a quick, 7-question survey.